Tag: 2010 Fall

Global Crisis, Global Justice: Human Needs, the Market System, & Social Alternatives

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David McNally
"Global Slump: Capitalism's Mutating Crisis"
Tuesday, September 7, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
"Beyond the Market: Radical Alternatives to Market Socialism"
Wednesday, September 8, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty, and Public
Thursday, September 9, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

This visit is part of an eight part series titled "SOCIALISM FOR THE 21st CENTURY: ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM AND HOW TO GET THERE"

Co-sponsored by Global Studies

DAVID MCNALLY is Professor of Political Science at York University, Toronto. He is the author of five previous books: Political Economy and the Rise of Capitalism (1988); Against the Market: Political Economy Market Socialism and the Marxist Critique (1993); Bodies of Meaning: Studies on Language, Labor and Liberation (2001); Another World is Possible: Globalization and Anti-Capitalism (2002; second revised edition 2006); and Monsters of the Market: Zombies, Vampires and Global Capitalism (forthcoming 2010). His articles have appeared in many journals, including Historical Materialism, Capital and Class, History of Political Thought, New Politics, Studies in Political Economy, and Review of Radical Political Economics. His book on the economic crisis, Global Slump: The Economics and Politics of Crisis and Resistance, will be published by PM Press in November. David McNally is also a long-time activist in socialist, anti-poverty and migrant justice movements.

READINGS:

Towards an Understanding of the Cuban Revolution

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Samuel Farber
"Cuba 1959: Roads Chosen and Not Chosen"
Tuesday, October 19, 4 pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
"Cuba Today: Current Trends and Future Developments"
Wednesday, October 20, 4 pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty, and the Public
Thursday, October 21, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

This visit is part of an eight part series titled "RENEWING SOCIALISM FOR THE 21st CENTURY: ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM AND HOW TO GET THERE"

Co-sponsored by Global Studies and the Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian Studies Program

SAMUEL FARBER was born and raised in Cuba and received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1969. He has written numerous books and articles on Cuba including Revolution and Reaction in Cuba, 1933-1960, and most recently, The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2006. He is currently working on a book on Cuba since the 1959 Revolution for Haymarket Press. He is an Emeritus Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York (CUNY.)

READINGS

Networks of Power, Degrees of Freedom

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Yochai Benkler
"From Free Software and Wikipedia to a Field of Cooperative Human Systems Design"
Wednesday, October 27, 4 pm, 8417 Social Science
"Freedom and Power in the Networked Information Environment"
Thursday, October 28, 4 pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Friday, Octbober 29, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by Global Studies

YOCHAI BENKLER is the Berkman Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard, and faculty co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Since the 1990s he has played a central part in characterizing the role of information commons and decentralized collaboration to innovation, information production, and freedom in the networked economy and society. His books include The Wealth of Networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom (Yale University Press 2006), which won academic awards in the disciplines of political science, sociology, and communications policy. His work is socially engaged, winning him the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Pioneer Award for 2007 and Public Knowledge's IP3 Award in 2006, and has been called a “reveille for netizens" by The Times of London and “Internet utopianism for grown-ups” by The American Prospect. At the same time, his work is highly grounded in economics and business. Wealth of Networks was cited as “perhaps the best work yet about the fast moving, enthusiast-driven Internet” by the Financial Times and was named best business book about the future in 2006 by Strategy and Business. His work can be freely accessed at benkler.org.

READINGS

The Dialectics of Social Change

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David Harvey
"Crisis Theory and the Current Conjuncture"
Tuesday, November 9, 4pm, 5208 Social Science
"A Commentary on Marx's Method"
Wednesday, November 10, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty, and Public
Thursday, November 11, 12:20pm, 3470 Social Science

This visit is part of an eight part series titled "RENEWING SOCIALISM FOR THE 21st CENTURY: ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM AND HOW TO GET THERE"

Co-sponsored by Global Studies and the UW Geography Department

DAVID HARVEY is Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York (CUNY) and Director of The Center for Place, Culture and Politics. Professor Harvey is a leading theorist in the field of urban studies whom Library Journal called "one of the most influential geographers of the later twentieth century." He was formerly professor of geography at Johns Hopkins, a Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics, and Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at Oxford. His reflections on the importance of space and place (and more recently "nature") have attracted considerable attention across the humanities and social sciences. His highly influential books include Social Justice and the City (1973); The Limits to Capital (1982); The Condition of Postmodernity (1989); Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference (1996); Spaces of Hope (2000); and Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography (2001); The New Imperialism (2003); and Spaces of Global Capitalism (2006). His most recent book is The Enigma of Capital and the Crises of Capitalism (Oxford University Press, 2010).

READINGS

The Market Frontier

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Arlie Hochschild
"So Close to Home: Intimate Life on the Market Frontier"
Tuesday, November 16, 4 pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
"Global Traffic in Female Service: Nannies, Surrogates, and Emotional Labor"
Wednesday, November 17, 4 pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty, and the Public
Thursday, November 18, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by Global Studies

A U.C. Berkeley sociologist, Arlie Hochschild is the author of The Managed Heart, The Second Shift, The Time Bind, The Commercialization of Intimate Life and the co-edited Global Woman: Nannies, Maids and Sex Workers in the New Economy. She is the winner of the A.S.A. Jessie Bernard Award,  and the 2000 Public Understanding of Sociology Award. Three of her books   have been selected as “notable books of the year” by the New York Times Book Review, plays have been based on two and her work has been translated into 14 languages. She’s finishing a book on the Commodity Frontier. According to Professor Hochschild, we live on a commodity frontier. On one side of it, we find unpaid intimate life and on the other side, we find goods and activities we pay for. This frontier pushes forward into (and sometimes draws back from) many realms of modern life – the realms of the economy, sports, prisons, arts, education. In this series of talks, Professor Hochschild focuses on those paid services which deal with the intimate realm of life at each stage of the life cycle.  Here she draws on interviews with clients and their love coaches, wedding planners, sometimes gestational surrogates, potty-trainers, parenting consultants, nannies, elder care managers, and burial ash distributors. As the commodity frontier moves, it alters what we do, how we think and how we feel.  It is a frontier in mentality.  When we hire service providers, we set up an “avatar-like” relationship between ourselves, she argues, and events of symbolic importance to us.   We become as managers of our private lives. This creates a new challenge to the deepest paradigm underlying all emotional life. Commodification threatens to detach us from our personal symbols. Through what she calls “market mechanisms of defense” we intuitively re-attach ourselves to those symbols. Indeed she theorizes there is a meta-emotion-work of ‘attachment and detachment’ required in the world of an advancing commodity frontier. She illustrates various mechanisms of defense and re-attachment.  These, she argues, we need to live modern lives, and also need to see “through” in order to understand the larger forces that require us need them.

READINGS

Ecosocialism: The Radical Alternative

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Michael Löwy
"What is Ecosocialism?"
Tuesday, December 7, 4 pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
"Ecosocialism and Democratic Planning"
Wednesday, December 8, 4 pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty, and the Public
Thursday, December 9, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

This visit is part of an eight part series titled "RENEWING SOCIALISM FOR THE 21st CENTURY: ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM AND HOW TO GET THERE"

Co-sponsored by Global Studies.

MICHAEL LOWY is emeritus Research Director at the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and lectures at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences in Paris. He is the author of over 200 articles and book chapters, as well as numerous books, including Romanticism against the Tide of Modernity (with Robert Sayre), The International Ecosocialist Manifesto (with Joel Kovel), Fire Alarm: Reading Walter Benjamin’s “On the Concept of History,” and The Theory of Revolution in the Young Marx. His works have been translated into 29 languages. Professor Löwy was born in Brazil in 1938 and has lived in Paris since 1969.

READINGS:

"Advertising is a 'Serious Health Threat' -- to the Environment"

"Ecosocialism and Spirituality" (with Frei Betto)