Tag: 2005 Spring

Science, Law, and Criminal Identity

Michael Lynch
DNA Testing, Fingerprinting, and the Credibility of Expert Evidence
Wednesday, February 16 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science
Administrative Objectivity: Settling a Legal/Scientific Controversy with Administrative Proxies
Thursday, February 17 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science
Seminar for Students and Faculty
Friday, February 18 2005, 9:30 am, 4314 Social Science

The Assassin of Relativity

Peter Galison
The Assassin of Relativity
Thursday, March 31 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science

Peter Galison is Mallinckrodt Professor of History of Science and of Physics at Harvard University. His main work explores the interaction between the three principal subcultures of twentieth century physics: experimentation, instrumentation, and theory. His volumes on experiment, How Experiments End (1987), and on instruments, Image and Logic (1997), are to be followed by a final volume – Theory Machines (forthcoming) – that focuses on the ways in which the theory of relativity stood at the crossroads of technology, philosophy, and physics. Professor Galison is also the author or co-author of several other books, including Picturing Science, Producing Art (1998) and The Architecture of Science (2000).

“ The Savage Freud: Further Remarks on Possible and Retrievable Selves"

Ashis Nandy
“The Savage Freud: Further Remarks on Possible and Retrievable Selves”
Monday, April 11 2005, 4:00 pm, 206 Ingraham

Ashis Nandy is a political psychologist and sociologist of science who has worked on cultures of knowledge, visions, and dialogue of civilizations. He is Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for the Study of Developing Societies and Chairperson of the Committee for Cultural Choices and Global Futures, both located in Delhi. Nandy is the author or co-author of thirteen books, including The Savage Freud and Other Essays on Possible and Retrievable Selves (1995), Barbaric Others: A Manifesto on Western Racism (1993), Traditions, Tyranny, and Utopias (1987), The Intimate Enemy (1983), and Alternative Sciences (1980). Nandy has also coauthored a number of human rights reports and is active in movements for peace, alternative sciences and technologies, and cultural survival.

Bipolar Expeditions: Toward an Antropology of Moods

Emily Martin
Taking the Measure of Moods
Wednesday, April 13 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science
Transcribing Emotions in Everyday Life
Thursday, April 14 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science
Seminar for Students and Faculty
Friday, April 15 2005, 9:30 am, 4314 Social Science

Emily Martin (Ph.D., Anthropology, Cornell University) is Professor of Anthropology at New York University. Her research interests include religion, ideology, politics, models and explanations in social anthropology, political economy of health, gender, anthropology of science, and rationality. She is the author of dozens of articles and book chapters and five books: The Cult of the Dead in a Chinese Village (1973), Chinese Ritual and Politics (1981), The Woman in the Body: A Cultural Analysis of Reproduction (Winner of Eileen Basker Memorial Prize, 1987), Flexible Bodies: Tracking Immunity in America from the Days of Polio to the Age of AIDS (1994); and Bipolar Expeditions: An Anthropology of Moods  (forthcoming). She has served on the Board of Directors of the Social Science Research Council and as president of the American Ethnological Society.

Designs on Nature: The Politics of Biotechnology in Europe and the United States

jasanoff.gif
Sheila Jasanoff
“Designs on Nature: The Politics of Biotechnology in Europe and the United States”
Thursday, April 21 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science
The Imagined Earth: Reflections on the Human Place in Nature
Friday, April 22 2005, 3:45 pm. Grainger Hall Room 1100. Part of "Earth Day 2005:A Reconsideration of Human and Environmental Vulnerability".
Seminar for Students and Faculty
Friday, April 22 2005, 9:30 am, 4314 Social Science

Sheila Jasanoff is Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Professor Jasanoff’s research centers on the role of science and technology in the political structures of modern democratic societies, with a particular focus on the use of science in law and public policy. She has written and lectured widely on problems of environmental regulation, risk management, and biotechnology in the United States, Europe, and India. Her books on these topics include Controlling Chemicals (1985), The Fifth Branch (1990), Science at the Bar (1995), and Designs on Nature (forthcoming, 2005). Jasanoff has served on the Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and as President of the Society for Social Studies of Science.

Women, Science, and Modernity

harding.gif
Sandra Harding
Science and Multiple Modernities
Wednesday, April 27 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science
Have Women Ever Been Modern? Political and Scientific Issues
Thursday, April 28 2005, 4:00 pm, 8417 Social Science
Seminar for Students and Faculty
Friday, April 29 2005, 9:30 am, 4314 Social Science

Sandra Harding is professor of Education and Women’s Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a philosopher, and taught for two decades at the University of Delaware before joining UCLA in 1996. At UCLA she directed the UCLA Center for the Study of Women for 5 years, and currently co-edits Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. She is the author or editor of twelve books and special journal issues, including The Science Question in Feminism (1986), Feminism and Methodology: Social Science Issues (edited, 1987), Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking From Women’s Lives (1991), The ‘Racial’ Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future (edited, 1993), Is Science Multicultural? Postcolonialisms, Feminists, and Epistemologies (1998), Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science & Technology (edited with Robert Figueroa, 2003), and The Feminist Standpoint Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies (edited, 2003).